Celebrity Video Service Review: Cameo, GalaxyCon, Streamily, vShout

Cameo, GalaxyCon Live, Streamily, and vShout all seek to bring fans closer to celebrities through video interactions. Furthermore, with the exception of Cameo, they all offer an option to purchase celebrity autographs. From there, the differences between the services can be quite nuanced. I’ll cover exactly what you can expect from each service to include: pricing and information about what you get when you purchase these companies’ celebrity autograph and video services.

Side by Side Service Comparison

Celebrity Video Service Match Up
ServicesCameoGalaxyCon LiveStreamilyvShoutNotes
Celebrity RosterVery GoodVery GoodVery GoodMedium
Autograph PricingN/A$96$65$55*Pokémon voice over actor Tara Sands’ autograph on Funko POP! figures used for price comparison.
Photo ChoicesN/AVery GoodGoodVery Good
Celebrity Videos – InteractivityIndirectDirectDirect and IndirectIndirectDirect videos are those that involve a live interaction.

Indirect videos are those that are prerecorded by a celebrity with no direct interaction from fans.
Celebrity Videos – priceGoodGoodincludedincludedCameo and GalaxyCon Live had equal pricing when comparing the cost of voice over actor David Kaye ($65).
Celebrity Videos – QualityVery GoodVery GoodGoodPoor
* Last available price data is from May 2020

Ranking by Autograph Services

Rosario Dawson with autographs
photo: Rosario Dawson at a GalaxyCon private signing

1. Streamily

Streamily is my top pick between all of the autograph services. While they concentrate mostly on video game and anime voice over actors, they do have a wide selection of celebrities to choose from. Furthermore, they are very active with bringing new guests and signings online. The constant rate that they churn out signings, means that on just about any given day, you can order an autograph, watch a live-stream, and interact with a celebrity from one of your favorite franchises. Even better, as I mentioned in my Streamily review, their service is only getting better as the young company continues to expand their offerings.

2. GalaxyCon Live

As their name suggests, GalaxyCon Live has made a name for itself through its pop culture and comic conventions. In recent years, they have expanded those in-person events to meet the demands of a public seeking to experience celebrity interactions remotely. Large conventions like the ones held by GalaxyCon can attract big name talent. The fact that they have grown accustomed to working with celebrities like Rosario Dawson gives them an edge over the competition.

However, while they do offer a lot of signings, they ultimately missed out on the #1 spot in the ranking due to their relative lack of offerings compared to their rival Streamily. They also took a hit in the rankings due to their relatively high prices compared to their direct competitors.

3. vShout

A subsidiary of the autograph company ZOBIE, vShout is a major player, both when it comes to autograph and celebrity shout-outs. They have a large selection of pre-signed back-inventory autographs to choose from and their prices are competitive. The only thing holding them back from ranking higher against their competition is their relative lack of talent. Like Streamily, their stable of celebrity signers largely consists of video game and anime voice over actors with the occasional wrestler thrown in for good measure.

4. Cameo

As noted above, Cameo is strictly a celebrity shout-out business with the exception of one-off instances where a celebrity may choose to include an autograph with the purchase of a video. Cameo CEO Steven Galanis has even said that selfies are the new autographs. While he does have a point that celebrity selfies and professional photo ops are only gaining in popularity, he is entirely too quick to count out autographs as a thing of the past.

Ranking by Celebrity Video Services

GalaxyCon Live Meet and Greet
photo: GalaxyCon

1. GalaxyCon Live

GalaxyCon Live is doing celebrity videos right. They aren’t just offering a three second celebrity shout-out or even a minutes long pre-recorded video, albeit tailor made for a fan. They are actually connecting fans and celebrities, live and face to face with their meet and greet packages. These packages get fans about as close to an in-person convention experience as they can get from the comfort of their own home. Meet and greets are interactive experiences where fans usually get about three minutes to talk with their favorite celebrities.

It’s a rich experience, because fans can take the conversation where they want to and utilize their time as they see fit. Maybe they just want to relay how much a celebrity has impacted their lives or perhaps simply ask a question or two. Either way, it’s a kind of interaction that outside of cons was something often only enjoyed by the fan mail and through the mail autograph collecting community.

2. Cameo

Given that Cameo is exclusively a celebrity video service, you might have expected it to be the best in that category. In some ways it is. Cameo does deliver its customers with videos usually lasting a minute or more. Customers can also make specific requests of the celebrities whether it be that they recite a movie quote or send well wishes for a special occasion like a birthday or other life events. Overall though, it’s services are limited as it lacks direct fan/celebrity interaction and neglects that autograph market all together.

3. Streamily

Streamily strikes a good balance between their autograph and live streaming services. When you buy a celebrity autograph from Streamily, you also get the opportunity to watch them sign it during a live-streamed signing event. During the live-stream, customers and celebrities have access to a chat room where they can interact with each other. Of course, the celebrities can also respond directly over the live-stream itself.

In a way, you’re getting that one on one celebrity interaction that GalaxyCon Live gives you, but to a much lesser degree. However, that difference is also reflected in the price because it’s baked into your autograph purchase. For no additional cost, you have a chance to speak directly to your favorite celebrity which is much more than you will get from some of the leading autograph signing companies like SWAU or Official Pix.

They do also have select offerings of personalized videos, much the same as the ones offered by Cameo. As the autograph/celebrity video company really begins to hit its stride, it could easily overtake Cameo in the celebrity video category.

4. vShout

While vShout bills itself as an autograph and celebrity shout-out business, the shout-outs take a back seat. When customers shop through vShout and buy an autograph, they also get a shout-out from that celebrity, which in all honesty is often little more than a few seconds long mention of the customer’s name. Their video offerings are so poor that they barely even fit into the category. To read more about them, you can check out a full review of vShout’s services.

The Best Celebrity Autograph / Video Service

Overall, the best celebrity autograph and video service is Streamily. When you factor in pricing, services, and celebrity rosters, the upstart service comes out ahead of the competition. I appreciate the balance they strike between providing fans with an affordable and accessible means of interacting with celebrities while maintaining a format that makes it possible at scale. They also deserve credit for their straightforward pricing model with minimal upcharges for things like dedications and inscriptions which more and more is becoming the industry standard.

Streamily: Best overall autograph and celebrity video service.
GalaxyCon Live: Best celebrity interactions with their meet and greet offerings.
Cameo: Best celebrity video message service.
vShout: Competitive pricing with great future potential.

vShout: Everything You Need to Know About the Autograph Service

Autograph signing company ZOBIE launched vShout in 2020. It’s their combination celebrity shout-out/autograph service that has been connecting fans and celebrities even from afar. The service arose in the wake of the comic and pop culture convention cancellations that dramatically changed the autograph industry as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. With no physical conventions at the time for celebrities to attend and sign autographs for fans, ZOBIE saw an opening in the market that needed to be filled, and they sought to do it virtually. vShout came to prominence along with similar services like Cameo, Streamily, and GalaxyCon Live. None of these services are exactly the same though.

Despite vShout getting its name from the pre-recorded shout-outs that come with autographs purchased through the service, the autographs themselves still take center stage. Their videos on the other hand seem more like an afterthought for vShout. Many of their shout-outs consist of little more than a brief three second aside. The company does have some aspects to its service that makes it unique and worthwhile though. So if you’re curious to know exactly what you’ll get from vShout, keep reading to find out about how their video services, pricing, and signing options stack up to other players in the autograph industry.

Pros and Cons of vShout’s Service

William Zabka vShout

I’ll start with what’s great about vShout—their autograph service. Parent company ZOBIE is one of the top recommended sellers of signed Funko POPs. They have built a solid reputation for selling authentic autographs thanks to the private signings they conduct with celebrities. So if you’re asking if ZOBIE, and by extension vShout, is legit, the answer is yes! You can buy with confidence when ordering through vShout’s online store. They even offer their own serialized stickers for tracking and assurance of authenticity. Alternatively you can pay an extra $10 for a JSA sticker.

Importantly, when you shop with vShout, you’re not just getting an autograph, you’re also getting a celebrity shout-out as well. Strangely though, pricing remains the same between ZOBIE and vShout. For example, a certified Christina Ricci autograph costs $110 from ZOBIE and the same from vShout, but with the additional video message. Furthermore, if you don’t opt for the JSA certification from vShout the price drops to $100. So in effect, you are getting more for less if you do a vShout signing over purchasing from ZOBIE’s stock. Of course, it should also be mentioned that ZOBIE and vShout are priced slightly above the competition with autograph services like Official Pix selling signed Christina Ricci 8x10s for only $90.

A Focus on Uncommon Signers

vShout
Photo: Streamily

The core of vShout’s signers are voice over actors (VOA) and talent from popular franchises that may not have been in the limelight for quite some time. That’s not to say that the autograph company’s stable of celebrity signers is undesirable, but they haven’t begun to offer the A-list actors that services like Star Wars Autograph Universe or Official Pix have come to be known for. In fact, the two biggest talents that sign for vShout are probably Christopher Lloyd and Christina Ricci. Both of them are also on competing services, so the company doesn’t have a lot of notable exclusives from the looks of it.

vShout’s User Experience

vShout-Logo-2022-Black
Photo: Streamily

Many customers have come away from vShout’s private signings feeling very happy with the experience. It starts with the ordering process which is pretty straight forward. You simply choose whether you are doing a send-in or pre-order and then you select your photo or arrange to have your item signed. If you are doing a send-in, most items must be pre-cleared by vShout so give yourself a good amount of lead-time ahead of the signing date. Once your order is in, it’s just a matter of waiting for your autograph and shout-out which will likely come at different times.

Of course, any time when you are dealing with shipping, there is a possibility that your items may be damaged. If that’s the case, vShout is committed to having the autograph re-done when damage occurs or if there is an error in the personalization, such as a misspelled name.

vShout’s Recorded Autograph Experiences

vShout is named after the company’s pre-recorded celebrity shout-out service, the eponymous vShout. Given that vShouts are its flagship service, one would expect them to be much more substantive than they are. In reality, the actual shout-out may be as brief as only mentioning the customer’s name, and may be as long as a few sentences. It’s unclear if the celebrities are simply disinterested in interacting with fans or if the pre-recorded nature of the shout-outs is so impersonal as to not elicit a genuine interaction.

Ultimately, it would seem that vShout is at least making an effort to create some kind of dialogue between fans and celebrities. On some of their autograph order pages, there is a box where customers can add personal notes for the signers to read. It’s unclear if this is being underutilized by fans /or if the notes simply aren’t being passed on by the company. Regardless, the results are pretty clear. Many fans find themselves underwhelmed by the two to three second shout-out they receive. Ultimately, it gives the impression that minimal effort is being put in by many of the company’s signers.

Print Selection / Send-in Options

VShout-Logo-Black-WithTagline
Photo: Streamily

While vShout has a fairly limited licensed print selection, they do tend to have a decent selection. Depending on the signer, you might see movie and TV stills, official artwork, or even fan art. Of course, just like their competitor Streamily, vShout also offers the same kinds of collages that have been plaguing voice actors’ convention booths for decades. So there is some bad mixed in with the good. That’s okay because fan art and character collages are to some fans’ liking, so I would say that they’ve stuck a good balance across a wide range of tastes.

If their stock photos aren’t to your liking though, then utilizing vShout’s send-in options would be a good choice. They offer send-in options for, if not all, then most of their signings. However, there are some limitations. They don’t accept full sized posters and items like Funko POPs and already signed items require customers to pay an upcharge for their handling that ranges between $10 to $30 extra. This is a fairly common practice for send-in signings, but it can still feel like companies are nickel and diming customers when they do it. Ultimately, their offerings are so diverse that every collector should be able to find something to get signed that they will be happy with.

Signed Funko POPs: Everything You Need to Know

How to Get Funko POPs Signed

Collecting Funko POPs is a hobby for some and an addiction for others. That’s thanks in large part to the incredible selection of figures that Funko produces. No matter what your interest, if it’s pop culture related, Funko almost certainly has you covered. The diversity of figures, their desirability among fans, and their ability to hold their value over the years have made them the perfect medium for autographs.

Autograph collecting is a big industry that continues to grow and signed Funko POPs are no small part of that growth. There are several newer companies that focus just on selling signed Funkos, while many of the industry veterans have long since adapted to the demand by including the figures in their offerings. For those interested in getting their Funko POPs signed, there are many ways to do it, including taking advantage of current celebrity autograph signings. There are however many things you need to take into consideration like the type of pen being used for the autograph, signature placement, the cost and long-term value of POPs and much more.

Comic and Pop Culture Conventions
Hailee-Steinfeld-Signing-Autographs

Walk past any autograph line at a con and you are likely to see a few guests holding Funko POPs. For many fans, there’s nothing better than meeting your favorite celebrity in person and getting something signed. That’s the main draw of conventions and it’s major advantage over private signings where you pay the same price (or sometimes even more) for an autograph, but get none of the personal interaction. When you go to get a POP signed at a convention, it is as much of a keepsake as it is a valuable collectible. It serves as an interesting display piece, but also as a reminder of your interaction with that celebrity.

Through The Mail (TTM)

You may be surprised to know that many actors and voice actors that commonly appear at conventions are happy to give fans free autographs who request one through the mail (TTM). That makes TTM collecting particularly appealing for those who can’t justify the expense of a pricey convention. Collecting autographs through the mail has been a hobby enjoyed by enthusiasts for easily over a century. Don’t let its history fool you though, it’s a hobby that is continually evolving and welcoming in newcomers to the fold. That even includes Funko POP collectors who want to get their figures signed. In six easy to follow steps, you could send your POPs through the mail for your favorite celebrity to sign.

Whether you are sending a Funko POP, a trading card, or a photo to be signed, the process is fundamentally the same. The only difference is with how you ship your box. The best way to send your Funko is to remove the figure and to break the box down flat for shipping. You would be well advised to also make it clear where you want your POP to be signed and what you are requesting (i.e. a dedication or quote). If you use Post-it notes or painters tape, it should come off with no damage to the box.

Where to Buy Signed Funko POPs

Signed Pops

If going to a convention to get Funko POPs signed in person is not your thing or it’s not an option available to you, you can still add these unique collectables to your collection. There is no shortage of places to buy already signed Funko POPs from. The reality is that most of the sales of signed POPs are usually conducted by private sellers. This unfortunately opens the door to fakes, which platforms like eBay and Mercari are filled with. Always shop with extreme caution when browsing through those sites.

It’s usually a safe bet to go through a vendor that specializes in the sale of signed Funkos. Some of these vendors do strictly online sales while others are storefronts for comic conventions. Some like GalaxyCon carry an inventory of signed POPs that they have built up from guests that appear at their shows. For the vendors that have made a name for themselves selling autographs, Funko POPs have been a big driver of sales. Most of them sell POPs to some extent while for others, the collectable figures may comprise the entirety of their business. Here are some of the biggest sellers of signed POPs.

GalaxyCon
GalaxyCon Logo

GalaxyCon has built a reputation for itself as a company that knows how to run a fun and worthwhile pop culture convention. Organizing lots of conventions means that they interact with a ton of celebrity guests—actors and voice actors alike. They also run a number of virtual conventions which helps to stack the roster of talent they’ve represented in the past. Funko POPs signed by many of the guests that GalaxyCon has worked with in the past can be found in their online store.

ZOBIE

ZOBIE has a small but dedicated following thanks to the many autograph signings they conduct. You can tell that they have a passion for signed Funko POPs in particular, as they maintain a pretty broad selection of the figures in their online store. If you can’t find the right POP, try sending in your Funko of choice. They conduct a number of private signings with celebrities and wrestlers and even offer send in options to get your personal items signed.

SWAU (Star Wars Autograph Universe)

SWAU has grown far beyond its original Star Wars roots to become a powerhouse in the autograph world. They have secured signings with some of the biggest talent in the industry. Aside from offering signings, they also have an inventory of signed photos and POPs. When it comes to authenticity, SWAU has never been questioned. If you find a signed Funko POP in their inventory then you can rest assured that it’s a genuine autograph.

More Notable Funko POP Vendors
Send-In Signings
Signed Pops

Autograph signings are becoming more and more common as autograph collecting transitions into being a mainstream hobby. Companies like Official Pix and ACE Comic Con have a long history of arranging signings with celebrities. Aside from offering a selection of merchandise for pre-order, often including Funko POPs, there is almost always a send-in option available. If you have a specific figure that you would like to get signed you can easily send it ahead of the signing date to get your Funko POP signed.

One of the best ways to participate in a send-in signing is to go through Streamily. Not only will you get to see your item signed on a live-stream with the celebrity, but you will also get to interact with them. These businesses all accept POPs for their signings:

Best Pens for Signed Funko POPs

When it comes to the best pens for autographs, paint pens are and always will be king. Ink fades over time, particularly when exposed to light. You might be surprised to see how fast something signed in blue sharpie will fade when on display. That’s why I prefer to use DecoColor paint pens. Not just for signing Funko POPs either. For pretty much any surface I can think of, a DecoColor paint pen would be my first choice. Not only does it last, but it puts down a thick, bold layer of paint—even when signing fast. The only caveat is that you should make sure that you test the marker before using it for signings. Depress the nib to ensure ink is flowing and test your pen on some scratch paper to ensure even flow first.

DecoColor paint pens do give you the best look, but they are a little expensive, especially if you are sending them through the mail; never to be seen again. In those instances, I tend to use metallic Sharpies. They aren’t paint pens, but tend to stand the test of time better than regular Sharpies. Furthermore, they have a low profile which makes them less intrusive when shipping them in a padded envelope. The final thing they have going for them is their low cost. It makes sending them off a lot more palatable for collectors with a budget. Ultimately, both options will look great when signing Funko POPs, whether that’s on the acetate window or the cardboard box.

If you have a valuable POP with a damaged window, the though of replacing it might seem scary, but there are only four steps to follow.

How Much are Signed Funko POPs

For years, naysayers have seen Funko POPs as a passing fad. However, Funko has shown time and time again that their collectable figures have real staying power—both in terms of collectability and their tendency to hold and even increase their value over time. If you’re interested in buying signed Funko POPs, then you’re likely wondering how much they cost. The majority of signed POPs can be purchased for under $100, but depending on the rarity of the figure and the signer who is providing the autograph, they can easily exceed $1,000.

In the autograph collecting world, signed 8×10 photos are usually the standard. They serve as the baseline for pricing while larger format items such as 16×20 photos and posters can sometimes demand an upcharge. So where do Funko POPs fall on the spectrum? Every seller is different, but we’ll look at SWAU‘s stock and compare their inventory of 8×10 photos and Funko POPs across the same signers.

Signer’s NameSigned 8×10 PhotosSigned Funko POPsPOP Premium
Dee Bradley Baker$60$7520%
Erin Moriarty$70$9022%
George Takei$125$15016%
Hayden Christensen$200$22510%
Jurnee Smollett$60$9033%
Katee Sackhoff$80$10020%
Natalie Portman$700$1,00030%
Sam Witwer$75$750%
William Shatner$150$17515%

How to Get Signed Funko POPs Authenticated

The process for authenticating an autograph is exactly the same whether it’s on a Funko POP, a photo, or otherwise. First and foremost, you should always make your own judgment on authenticity when considering buying a signed Funko POP. Simply do a side by side comparison between your prospective purchase and several authentic examples. Photos of authentic autographs can serve as a baseline reference. Doing this basic comparison will help you to avoid the most obvious fakes.

Sometimes, the help of an expert authenticator is required to determine if an autograph is genuine or not. In cases where you want to get an item authenticated that’s being sold online, services like Beckett’s Signature Review and PSA’s Quick Opinion will do the trick. They allow you to submit photos of the signature for them to render a qualified authentication. It’s qualified since they can’t physically examine the autograph and therefore can’t say with as high a degree of confidence that an autograph is authentic in the same way they could if they had a signature in front of them.

If you already own a signed POP, then you can bring it to an event for authentication where a third party authenticator (i.e. JSA, Beckett, or PSA) is in attendance. You can also ship your autographs directly to an authentication company. Full authentication will come with a unique serial number attached to a sticker or letter of authenticity. The cost of authentication depends on who the signature belongs to, but most cost between $20 and $50.

How to Encapsulate Signed Funko POPs

PSA Funko Grading

If you have a valuable Funko POP figure, whether it’s signed or not, keeping it in mint condition is probably a high priority for you. What was once exclusive to valuable collectables like trading cards and comics is now available for POPs as well. PSA’s encapsulation service offers collectors the opportunity to encase their figures in hard plastic tamper evident holders. These things are tough. Denting the corners of your box or scratching your POP’s window will no longer be a concern once you get it slabbed in a PSA encapsulation. The one drawback to PSA’s service is that they don’t offer grading of POPs only of the autograph itself.

Best Signature Placement on Funko POPs

Signature placement on Funko POPs is pretty cut and dry, but a lot of fans make the mistake of choosing less than ideal placement. The “sweet spot” on a Funko POP box is the front of the window. There is a big space for the signer to place their autograph and the acetate window holds ink well, especially from paint pens. Many Funko collectors like to stack their POPs for display and a well placed signature on the window will always be visible. On the other hand, signatures on the sides or bottom of the box will often be missed. If you own signed POPs, you paid a premium for the signature, so make sure that your autograph is well placed and always visible.



How to Replace Funko POP Windows [4 Easy Steps]

Funko Pop Window Swap [Removal and Replacement]

There comes a time in every POP collector’s life when they may want to replace the window on one of their cherished POPs. For most collectors, the need to replace a POP’s window arises when it gets scratched or dented. However, if you collect signed POPs, then it can be a very valuable technique for autograph collectors. Let me give you an example.

Let’s say that you are a Natalie Portman fan and you really want her autograph on a Queen Amidala figure. But what if the only signed POP you can find that has Natalie Portman’s signature on it is one of her characters from Thor—Jane Foster. Assuming the autograph is on the window, you can simply swap the unsigned one for the signed one. The process is pretty starlight forward, but it does take some patience and a few supplies.

Before you get started swapping the windows on your Funko POP, you’re going to need to gather some supplies, many of which you may already have at home. First you’re going to need a “donor POP” a lower value Funko POP that you can take the acetate window from to swap with your high-value POP. You’ll also need something thin and rigged to separate the window from the boxes. I prefer to use these metal scraping tools as they will help get the job done efficiently. However, even something like a gift card will work in a pinch. To ease the separation, it helps to first loosen the glue with heat. For that, you can use whatever hair dryer you happen to have laying around or you can go for a very basic model like Revlon’s compact hair dryer. Once the window is removed, I recommend that you clean off the old glue and paper residue with Goo Gone adhesive remover. Finally, you’ll need a simple tube of Super Glue to reinstall the window.

How to Swap Funko POP Windows

Several methods for removing the windows from Funko POPs have been proposed by collectors over the years. Some include sticking your POP box in the freezer which might do more harm than good. The best available method is listed below. It was recommended by several users on Reddit and tested by YouTuber Kuya Magik.

Step 1: Break Down the Funko POP Boxes
Funko Pop box breakdown
photo: Kuya Magik

Now that you have your supplies ready it’s time to start removing your POP windows. A word of warning though before you begin. Some paper from the inside of your POP boxes will be lifted and there is the possibility of damaging your box if you are not careful, so please proceed with caution and at your own risk. Now that that’s out of the way, put your long scraping tool under the lid of your POP and apply upward pressure to open the box. This will apply even pressure to the lid and help to prevent the box from bending at flex points. This is more likely to occur if you are opening your pop box by hand.

Step 2: Soften POP’s Window Glue with Hair Dryer
Funko Pop Hair Dryer Window Removal
photo: Kuya Magik

Once your box is open, set all of the contents aside. Then take your hair dryer and start blowing warm air onto the glued down portions of your window until the glue begins to soften. As it does, work your scraping tool between the window and the box to separate the two. This may take longer than you think so expect to spend about seven to ten minutes with just the separation phase alone.

Step 3: Clean and Prep POP Windows for Replacement
Funko Pop Hair Dryer Window Removal
photo: Kuya Magik

You will need to remove the windows from both of the POPs that you are doing the window swap on. Once they are removed, apply Goo Gone only to the areas that have glue and paper residue. Allow the solution to penetrate for a few minutes and then simply wipe everything off. A word of caution though. If you are removing a POP window that has a signature or stickers that you want to keep, be very careful when applying the Goo Gone. It can potentially ruin your stickers or remove ink from the signature.

Step 4: Apply Glue and Swap Funko POP Windows
Funko Pop Glue on Window
photo: Kuya Magik

With the windows removed from your Funko POP box, the hard part is over. All that’s left is to swap your windows, putting the one in the best condition or whichever has the autograph on your high value POP and putting the damaged or unsigned one on your donor POP. To do this simply run a thin bead of super glue along the edge of your window. Don’t apply glue anywhere that the window will not be making contact with the box. Once the glue is applied, line it up and apply pressure to the window and the box to make sure that it adheres at all contact points.

Autograph Collector Seeks C-3PO Image Anthony Daniels Won’t Sign

There is one image that C-3PO actor Anthony Daniels refuses to sign. To understand why some fans have been trying to get one over on the Star Wars actor, you’re going to need a little bit of backstory on the actor and the image known as the lewdest official Star Wars photo ever to be released. The story starts a long time ago, in a galaxy not so far away—Topps Headquarters in Brooklyn, New York circa 1977 to be exact. Following Star Wars‘ release in ’77, the renowned trading card company was in a rush to get cards featuring images from the hot property onto stores’ shelves. They had stacks of movie stills to go through and one featuring Goldenrod’s golden rod somehow slipped through the cracks and made it to print. It would eventually become known fondly by the Star Wars community as the “C-3PO boner image”.

Keeping in mind that Anthony Daniels has literally embodied 3PO since mid-1976 when Star Wars began filming, the two have become inseparable. You can’t talk about Daniels without mentioning C-3PO so it’s natural that the nearly 80 year old actor has grown protective of the character and the droid’s image. So much so, that he has allegedly accosted fans at conventions to the point of tears for presenting him with the image to sign. For fans, owning this particular image autographed by Daniels has become an impossibility.  However, when it comes to Star Wars fans and autograph collectors attaining the unattainable is all part of the fun.

Breaking Protocol: Getting the “C-3PO Boner” Image Signed

2610-1977-topps-star-wars-207-3po-error-unissued-blank-back-proof-card-3

While the image of C-3PO and his golden appendage may be well known to many fans, the fact that Anthony Daniels loathes it is not necessarily common knowledge. One fan found that out the hard way in 2009. That’s when autograph collector Mike Navarro sought to get Daniels’ signature on the infamous card at a convention in Plano, Texas. Not knowing the stir that it would cause, Navarro asked a fellow convention goer to get the card signed on his behalf so that he could attend photo ops with Dave Prows (Darth Vader), Jeremy Bulloch (Boba Fett), and Peter Mayhew (Chewbacca).

Once Navarro’s friend made it in front of Daniels, she presented him with the card to be signed. Daniels then got quite upset at the sight of it and allegedly said some derogatory things to the fan which caused her great embarrassment and ultimately made her break out in tears on the spot. Recalling the situation, Navarro said “at that time, I figured he signed those at every show he does, but since then I’ve learned [otherwise]!”

Since that fateful day, Navarro vowed that he was going to get that image signed one way or another. He got his chance nearly nine years later when Daniels was a guest at Fan Expo Dallas. By that time, Navarro was painfully aware of Daniels’ feelings about signing the infamous Topps card. Adding to the challenge, Daniels is well known to have a policy of not signing blank paper such as index cards. As a work around, Navarro tried his luck by asking the veteran actor to sign a “blank” Star Wars comic cover with only the title at the top. To his surprise it worked and Daniels signed his name at the bottom of the comic.

C-3PO Boner Sketch on Star Wars Comic (3)
Photo: Mike Navarro

Now that he had Daniels’ signature at the bottom, all that was left to do was commission an artist to draw 3PO in all his glory. The results turned out pretty great. Navarro later went on to get one step closer to his original intent of having his Topps card signed. By removing the autograph sticker from an official Star Wars autograph card and placing it on his own, he got just about as close as anyone will ever get to having an autograph on an authentic C-3PO “boner” card. Navarro’s antics didn’t stop there though as he’s continued to corner the market on these unique pieces, even going so far as to get a second sketch done.

Streamily Review: Everything You Need to Know [Autograph Service]

Streamily was founded in 2020 by entertainment industry veteran Dave Earnest. The company launched with impeccable timing, capturing a moment when lockdowns due to COVID-19 were forcing everyone to experience the world remotely. That didn’t just mean working from home, pop culture conventions were also going virtual and Streamily was one of the few companies to capitalize on the moment, at least in the autograph space.

The online autograph company aims to create a paradigm shift in not only the way that autographs are signed, but also the way that celebrities interact with their fans in the digital age. I’m not talking about something impersonal like turning autographs into NFTs either. The autograph service has a web store where autographs can be purchased on demand, but their big appeal is their live signings in which fans can interact with celebrities in real-time as they sign autographs from the comfort of their own homes.

Streamily is seeking to bridge the gap between fans and celebrities and in some ways, is providing an even more personal experience than what fans would normally have even with a face to face interaction at a convention. That’s hard to imagine, but at a traditional convention there is a lot of pressure to keep the autograph line moving. At cons, fans are rushed through the line in order to make the most sales possible in order to cover the cost of renting a physical space, hiring tons of support staff, and providing travel arrangements and accommodations for guests. Ultimately that means you might have less than 60 seconds of interaction in a traditional setting. Thankfully, Streamily is flipping the script in a way that gives celebrities more time to interact with their fan base.

Pros and Cons of Streamily’s Service

There are a lot of reasons why you might decide to use Streamily’s autograph signing services. They offer some rare talent, make signings accessible to a broad fan-base, and offer a chance for personal interactions with celebrities. It’s not a perfect service though. There are some areas for improvement for this relative newcomer to the autograph space. However, the company is working on a lot of big changes: site renovations, concise messaging, and much needed upgrades to their current shipping options.

Smart Focus on Uncommon Signers

Photo: Streamily

Streamily has a lot of great things going for it. First and foremost is the talent that it attracts. Most of the celebrities that the autograph company works with are voice-actors from the anime and video game world—a seriously underserved market. The International Trade Administration estimates that when Streamily got up and running in 2020 “the global video game industry was valued at $159.3 billion, with 2.7 billion gamers worldwide.” That’s a lot of enthusiastic fans who are spending mountains of money on the industry, but they have been largely ignored by convention organizers. Typically, only a few big-name voice actors like Mario’s Charles Martinet tend to draw focus from convention organizers. Not at Streamily though. There they are front and center. Focusing on this underserved market is not only something the celebrities enjoy, but it offers fans a unique experience to interact with their favorite voice actors in a way that may have only been accessible by through the mail autograph collectors in the past.

While fan-favorites like Steve Blum, Tara Strong, and Sean Astin have all done signings with Streamily, the autograph company brings a lot of added value beyond just the individual signers they work with. They will often bring groups of celebrities into their stable of talent who have all worked on the same project. This is a huge help for people who are trying to complete multi-signed cast pieces. No more sending one photo to ten different conventions to try and complete it, now that Streamily aims to be a one-stop shop. They represent talent from multiple popular franchises to include: Pokemon, Genshin Impact, Fire Emblem, Dragon Ball Z, Metal Gear Solid, and Persona.

Streamily’s Excellent User Experience

Photo: Streamily

In the short time they’ve been in business, Streamily has built a strong reputation for transparency and good customer service, which isn’t always the case with autograph signing companies. They are known for providing timely responses to emails and quickly and professionally addressing customers’ concerns. They also allow users to update their orders by logging into their account on streamily.com where they can change things like to who the photo is dedicated to and what inscription you’re asking for (whether that be a quote or character name).

With any online business, shipping is a key concern for Streamily as well. Given the company’s business model where celebrities sign from their homes and then ship signed photos to Streamily for further distribution, getting every autograph to the right place seems like it would be a logistical nightmare. However, they’ve been able to pull it off with surprisingly few complaints.

According to Streamily, the company “works with artists around the world. It typically takes a few days to a week to receive all autographs for processing and shipment. Times vary depending on artist’s location and schedule. In rare cases it can take two weeks or longer to receive autographs for processing due to the artist’s schedule or if the artist is in a remote location. Both Streamily and the artist strive to get your autographs to you as quickly and efficiently as possible. Streamily works to ensure all orders are processed and sent out expediently.”

Autographs usually arrive from Streamily without a problem. However, in the rare case where an autograph does come damaged, customers have reported that the company has been quick to resolve the situation by either sending full refunds or replacement damaged autographs. That’s great, but when it comes to shipping, there is a lot of room for improvement. For reasons unknown to me, Streamily does not offer combined shipping for multiple items. This is a big problem given that one of the major appeals of the service is that they offer multiple associated celebrities which incentivizes ordering from several actors at one time. However, it’s a problem that the company has acknowledged and is seeking to rectify in the future. Customers based outside of the U.S. should also exercise caution as some have reported experiencing shipping costs that exceed the price of the autograph itself.




Live-Streamed Autograph Experience

@cristinavox Link in bio!! Woohoo!! #voiceover #miraculousladybug #genshinimpact #hunterxhunter #helluvaboss ♬ Caramelldansen – English Version – RichaadEB

The fact that live-streaming autograph signings is at the core of Streamily’s business model makes it unique among its competitors. For example, GalaxyCon Live offers online ordering for their autograph signings and offers virtual meet and greets for fans to have one on one interactions with celebrities. However, they don’t offer a unified experience in the same way that Streamily does. When Streamily does a live signing, whether through their own channel or the celebrity’s personal account, customers get a chance to not only see their autograph being signed, but can interact with them as they do it. Celebrities know who they are signing for and will usually give a shout out to them on the stream. In turn, fans can send messages to a chat the signer has access to. Fans will often take advantage of this to send questions or relay how much the signer’s work means to them.

Print Selection / Send-in Options

Photo: Streamily

At this time, one of the biggest drawbacks of using Streamily’s service is the selection of their stock photos. The images may be to some fans’ taste, but I find a lot of the photos they offer to be a little tackey. There is a noticeable lack of officially licensed photos to choose from. Instead, most of the company’s offerings consist of prints of fan art and the kind of collages that have been plaguing voice actors’ convention booths for decades. But to be fair, many of the image choices apparently come directly from the celebrities so it’s no mere coincidence that what is offered by Streamily is on par with the table photos that you might find at a convention.

On the plus side, Streamily does offer a small selection of officially licensed products for their signings. These can include figures like Funko Pops or even trading cards. However, there is often slim pickings with these offerings. For example, Streamily offered customers the chance to get Pokémon cards signed by Brock voice actor Bill Rogers. A great option, but the selection was limited to the Pokémon that Rogers has voiced rather than cards which featured Brock himself, the trainer that Rogers is known for portraying.

If you aren’t happy with Streamily’s photo selection, one way to ensure that you get the image singed that you want, is to send in your own. Send-ins are currently something that Streamily is offering on a limited basis. However, the company’s founder Dave Earnest anticipates rolling out send-ins for all signings at some point in the future. Handling customers’ items is an expensive and delicate operation, so the rollout is taking some time for this still young company.

Autograph Pricing

Photo: Streamily / Konami

The autograph industry rakes in millions of dollars a year from conventions, private signings, and the secondary market. There is a lot of money to be made selling autographs. Some companies are cashing in by prioritizing their bottom line without regard for the rising cost of the hobby. The trend is unfortunately pricing many collectors out of the experience of interacting with their favorite celebrities. Luckily, Streamily does not seem to be one of those companies. Their prices appear to be on-par with what you would expect to pay at a celebrity’s booth at a comic con.

In fact, they are bucking industry pricing trends and holding the price of autographs down. It has become common place for companies like Star Wars Autograph Universe and Official Pix to drown fans in add-on costs for everything from adding a dedication (i.e. “To Customer Name”) or inscriptions like quotes and character names. While Streamily doesn’t guarantee that their talent will honor requests for dedications and inscriptions, it doesn’t upcharge their customers for them.

Shipping Costs

Streamily currently offers free shipping on members’ first order (up to a $14 value). After that, shipping on subsequent orders is dependent on the customer’s location. However, you can expect to pay between $12 and $14 for shipping to the lower 48 states.

Streamily Membership Costs

Streamily Services

Personalized Videos on Streamily

Personalized Videos on Streamily

If you were hoping for an experience more similar to what Cameo offers, i.e. long-form video shout-outs where celebrities record specific messages, then Streamily has you covered. At least sometimes anyway. Depending on the celebrity, personalized videos are an option on some order pages. However, this is a feature that doesn’t seem to be well implemented yet as it is not something that Streamily offers for most of their signers. To see how else Streamily stacks up against its competitors Cameo, GalaxyCon, and vShout, check out the side by side comparison for the leading celebrity video services.

Final Thoughts

Despite how new the company is, Streamily has managed to turn itself into a success story. It’s a business that cares about their fans and they show it through their reasonable prices and commitment to opening a dialogue between enthusiasts and celebrities. They are also working on a number of improvements to include: transparent order tracking, an expanded send-in service, and an enhanced user experience on their website. As Streamily starts hitting their stride, I think we can expect to see a lot more great offerings and innovations for the company that has “customer first” as one of their core values.

Streamily does offer a membership program, sometimes referred to as the family membership, that comes with a few benefits. For a monthly subscription fee of $9.99, members get free shipping on their orders, access to autograph giveaways, and a guarantee to have your items signed live. Additional “perks” worth mentioning are text updates telling you when your order is about to be signed and early access to information about signings. Of course, you can cancel at any time by contacting Streamily’s customer support.

Does Streamily Accept PayPal?

Currently, Streamily only allows for customers to checkout with credit card payments. If you want to by an autograph, there is unfortunately no option to pay with PayPal.

Celebrity Autographs Q3 2022: Star Wars, Disney, MTG, More!

I am an autograph collector who enjoys the hobby by reaching out to celebrities, athletes, and other public figures through fan mail. If I’m lucky, I get a response and hopefully an autograph. I got a number of interesting replies from actors, voice actors, directors and video game designers. You can see everything I got from April to June of 2022. If you’d like to give through the mail (TTM) autograph collecting a try, check out these simple steps to get started writing fan mail and getting autographs TTM.

Through The Mail (TTM) Autographs

Billy Howle

Billy Howle is a British actor known for his role as Rey’s father in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2020). I ordered the above Episode IX mini posters from Japan to send to him so they had a really long trip to the U.S. to the U.K. and back. Nevertheless, Billy signed and returned both in good condition. His signature in black in on the black starfield shows up pretty well in the picture, but is quite hard to see in person. Billy’s autograph pops much better on the other poster however.

Billy Howle Fan Mail Address

Billy Howle
c/o Conway Van Gelder Grant Ltd
3rd Floor
8-12 Broadwick Street
London W1F 8HW
United Kingdom

Tim Allen

Tim Allen autograph

Tim Allen is one of the top celebrities that sign autographs through the mail. I’ve never taken the time to write to him myself until now though. I sent two index cards and was happy to see both of them returned signed along with a nice surprise. His production studio sent two stickers with the text “Wrap tissues, good for 201 Blows!”. 201 refers to the number of episodes in the series (204 if you count the final episode’s 3 parts and the retrospective episode). You can imagine that these were on tissue boxes on the Home Improvement set as the cast and crew were wrapping the series. It should be said that many autograph collectors believe Tim Allen’s TTM autographs to be secretarial signatures. This may be the case, but it’s very hard to say either way as the autographs coming out of his agency very much match Tim’s signature style.

Tim Allen Fan Mail Address

Tim Allen
Boxing Cat Entertainment
11500 Hart Street
North Hollywood, CA 91605

Yoshitaka Amano

Yoshitaka Amano recently made his autograph available through a collaboration with Japanese sake brewer Asahara Shuzo Brewery Co. Certain customers who bought limited edition sake adorned with Amano’s art on the label also received an autograph board signed by Amano with a hand drawn sketch. Don’t ask me what he drew on mine, but having anything inked by the famed Final Fantasy and Vampire Hunter D illustrator is an honor.

Yoshitaka Amano Fan Mail Address

Yoshitaka Amano
c/o Publicity Department
Simon & Schuster, Inc.
1230 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020
USA

Camila Cabello

Camila Cabello

Camila Cabello is one of the top artists that sell their autograph. She can be pretty dependably relied on to sell signed copies of her latest albums via her official store prior to their release.

Catherine O’Hara

A holiday tradition in my family is to watch a few of the Christmas movie classics like Home Alone and Elf. Last holiday season I decided to write Catherine O’Hara and tell her about how much we love watching her movies around that special time of year. I was happy to get the photo that I sent her and the two index cards all back signed by Catherine. Come December, the photo will be going up on display with all of my other holiday themed autographs!

Catherine O’Hara Fan Mail Address

Catherine O’Hara
c/o Brillstein Entertainment Partners
9150 Wilshire Blvd.
Suite 350
Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Magic The Gathering Artists

Getting your Magic the Gathering (MTG) cards signed by artists is surprisingly easy to do. There are a number of ways to get an autograph on your MTG cards including going through the artist directly or through some of the major signing services that act as intermediaries by facilitating the transaction between fans and the artist. Here are some of the recent autographs I’ve received from MTG artists.

Ilse Gort

Ilse Gort singed MTG cards

Ilse Gort is a MTG artist based in the Netherlands. I sent her an email ([email protected]) inquiring about how much her signing fee is for Magic cards. She let me know that she charges  $2 for a black signature and $4 for a gold or silver shadow signature which is basically two overlapping signatures, creating a shadow effect. In addition to the signing fee, it was only $4 for the return shipping all the way to the United States! Given the huge distance the cards had to travel from the U.S. to the Netherlands and back, the whole process was very quick. I got my cards back in just a little over a month. If you’re interested in getting your cards signed, send Ilse an email and make arrangements from there.

Steve Prescott

Steve Prescott signed MTG cards

Steve Prescott is a long-time MTG artist. I sent him a handful of cards to sign which he charged a modest fee of only $2 per signature.

Steve Prescott
5589 Parker Hill Ln
Dublin, OH 43017

Julian Kok Joon Wen

Julian Kok Joon Wen

Julian Kok is an art director at Ubisoft Singapore where he has worked on major video game titles like the recent Fallout 6. He is also a freelance illustrator at Wizards of the Coast where he has done art for a number of different MTG cards.

Julian Kok
32 Cassia Crescent
#08-52 Singapore
S390032
[email protected]

Gaboleps

After the release of Kamigawa, I headed out to pick up a few backs of cards. From those packs, I looked up every artist and contacted as many as I could in order to inquire about getting my cards signed through the mail. That even included foreign artists like New Zealand=based Gaboleps. If your interested in getting your own MTG cards signed by Gaboleps, I did put him in contact with Mark Aronowitz’s MTG signing service so I would expect to see a signing offered through Mark in the near future.

Interview with Craig Miller: Lucasfilm Director of Fan Relations (1977-1980)

Craig Miller was the original Director of Fan Relations at Lucasfilm starting his work there in 1977—the same year that “Star Wars” was released. His work with Lucasfilm let him wear many hats including: publicist, writer, editor, and producer. He wrote press material and articles and created and ran the Official Star Wars Fan Club. As part of that operation, Craig oversaw a small staff who opened and responded to the mountains of fan mail from a public that couldn’t get enough of the burgeoning franchise.

His work extended beyond the fan club though. He was also the producer on projects including episodes of “Sesame Street” where he operated R2-D2 and spent weeks hanging out on the set of “The Empire Strikes Back”. In his memoir “Star Wars Memories” he recalls all of that and more, including Mark Hamill barbecuing him a burger in London, having lunch in a Sunset Strip restaurant with Harrison Ford while he rolled and smoked a joint, and watching Carrie Fisher introduce “The Empire Strikes Back’s British production crew to tacos.

I had the pleasure of getting to ask Craig about some of his memories from his years at Lucasfilm as well as a bit about how the fan mail and fan relations portion of his job worked. Afterall, Star Wars and fan mail have a long history together, so I was eager to learn more from someone who was instrumental to Lucasfilm’s whole fan mail operation.

Craig Miller Interview

Craig Miller

The Star Wars Fan Club

TFTC: You were the Director of Fan Relations for Lucasfilm from 1977–1980. Since you were in uncharted waters, did you have any kind of external reference to guide you in the initial stages?

Craig Miller: No, not even sure where I could have found such a guide.  I was charged to figure out how to deal with all the fan mail that was coming in to Fox and Lucasfilm and to create and oversee the Official Star Wars Fan Club.  So I just kind of figured out what I’d want if I was someone who sent in fan mail or wanted to join a fan club and kind of reverse engineered how to deliver that.  I went out and met with a few companies that did it for rock stars and movie stars and didn’t like their attitudes or how they treated the fans.  More like address harvesting services that would send out the least they could.  Not how I or George or anyone wanted to see the fans treated.  Decided we’d do it in-house and just went ahead with it.

TFTC: I’ve heard George Lucas can get very focused on minute details of his work. Was he closely involved with the fan club and newsletter or did he leave their operation all up to you?

Craig Miller: The operation was pretty much left up to me.  There were people who had to give approvals but they were mostly budgetary matters. The only content approval, really, was copy editing the text of the articles I wrote for Bantha Tracks.  (I wrote pretty much everything for the first few years.)  There were things that needed to be kept secret but as a publicist for Lucasfilm, I was well aware of what they were.

TFTC: One of the things the original Star Wars Fan Club was known for was its mail forwarding service in which fans could send fan mail directly to their favorite actors from the movies. Can you share your recollections of how the individual actors thought of the fan mail they were getting and how those opinions changed over time?

Craig Miller: The process was that anything addressed to an actor got forwarded to that actor.  Or to a specific production crew member, though we didn’t really get many of those.  After it left our hands, we didn’t really deal with it, although we would provide them with photos if they wanted to send them out.  We didn’t have any control over how they dealt with their fan mail. 

For mail addressed to Fox or Lucasfilm or George Lucas, I wrote about a dozen different form letters, responding to the typical comments and questions we received.  Send me something.  Send me a photo.  Can I work on the next movie? How do I get a job in Hollywood?  A number of different categories.  Some letters I’d write individual responses.  I had a staff of three people sorting and processing all the mail as it came in.  That’s the kind of volume of mail we were dealing with.

I had a staff of three people sorting and processing all the mail as it came in.

We would sometimes get fan letters addressed to R2-D2 or Darth Vader.  That is, to the characters, not the actors.  These were usually from young kids.  Those we’d respond to.  Sometimes with a photo.  The ones of Darth Vader were autographed “Darth Vader”.  I am Darth Vader.

TFTC: Running a newsletter means you must have sourced and commissioned a lot of art. Who were some of your favorite artists to work with?

Craig Miller: Actually, no.  For Bantha Tracks, pretty much everything we ran were photographs or production art already done for the movies.  I can’t recall any art we commissioned for the newsletter.  Though I did get to work with Ralph McQuarrie for the Fan Club.  Ralph, of course, had a long association with Star Wars.  When we decided to include an original poster in the Fan Club Membership Kit, there was no one else I could think of who would be better or more appropriate.  For me it was particularly great because I got to design the poster and Ralph painted it.  Ralph was a wonderful, friendly guy and it was an honor to work together with him on it.  I’d already met him and we were friends so that made it even easier. 

Star Wars Fandom

TFTC: Who would get the most fan mail?

Craig Miller: I don’t remember for sure.  We didn’t count it.  But my memory is that Mark Hamill got a Lot.  He might have gotten the most.

TFTC: Who was the most and least likely to respond?

Craig Miller: Again, once it went to the actor, we didn’t keep track.

Signed photo by Star Wars actor Anthony Daniels

TFTC: When you were dealing with the franchise, the fan base was united in their love of Star Wars. It seems now that a lot of fans love to complain about Star Wars more than they actually like Star Wars itself. When do you think that shift started to happen?

Craig Miller: There were always people who were unhappy about something.  People don’t remember that there was a contingent of people who complained about Empire because there was too much humor.  Or why was a Jedi (Yoda) being a hermit? Of course, Obi-wan was a hermit.  They forgot that.  But it was before the internet so every voice wasn’t echoed or archived for posterity.  Lucasfilm got the same “hermit” complaint about Luke in the sequels.  But at that point, *every* Jedi we’d ever met had become a hermit when he got older.  There were problems with the Prequels and the Sequels.  They aren’t as good as the original films.  But the noise and complaints are, I think, greatly an artifact of the internet.  Some people thrive on knocking stuff, be it Star Wars or whatever.  They get reactions to their snarky comments and they eat it up.  So we’re seeing a lot more of it in every area than we ever did before.  Star Wars, Marvel movies, restaurants, whatever.  The internet is a great addition to our world but it isn’t without faults.

Experiences with the Star Wars Cast and Crew

TFTC: From your time working with Lucasfilm, what are some of the memories that you cherish the most?

Craig Miller: There are a lot.  I mean, I’ve written an entire book about my years with Lucasfilm, “Star Wars Memories”. But some of them include spending several weeks in England at the studio while we were shooting Empire and all that went on there.  Going over to Mark Hamill’s house in London for dinner (burgers cooked by Mark on what may well have been the only backyard barbecue grill in London at the time).  Being Producer for Lucasfilm on episodes of Sesame Street guest starring R2 and Threepio and operating R2.  And, of course, meeting my future wife at a convention while giving a preview presentation about Empire.

TFTC: Are you still in contact with any of the Star Wars cast and crew or your former Lucasfilm associates? 

Craig Miller: I’m not still in regular contact with any of the stars although there are occasional greetings and contacts.  Especially when we end up at the same conventions.  I do frequently talk to/exchange email with a number of the production folks, people from ILM, and Lucasfilm staffers.

TFTC: in recent years we’ve seen the passing of many beloved cast members. I know fans have deeply felt the loss of Carrie Fisher, Jeremy Bulloch, and David Prowse, but you knew many of the actors on a personal level. How has dealing with the passing of some of Star Wars’ biggest names been for you?

Craig Miller: Death is something we all have to deal with.  More and more as we – and our friends – get older.  And it’s never easy, whether they’re famous or just “people”.  I’ve been interviewed by the New York Times when Gary Kurtz passed away and San Diego Comic-Con asked me for to provide memorial statements for their publications the years Gary and Carrie died.  In some ways, being able to write down your feelings about the person and their passing makes it easier to get through the wall of emotion and memories that comes with someone’s death.

TFTC: You mentioned that you met your wife at a convention in the early 80’s. What were conventions like back then? I imagine they were nothing like the multi-million dollar business they are now.

Craig Miller: I met my wife at a convention in Chicago in 1979.  You’re right; there weren’t the giant conventions like today’s San Diego Comic-Con, DragonCon, or Celebration back then.  A big convention was 10,000 people, not 100,000+.  So it was a different world.  Much friendlier in that you could meet most anyone appearing.  And celebrities signed autographs for free.  Although, there were also far fewer celebrities attending cons back then, since there wasn’t the money to pay for them to come.  And until Star Wars and Empire, studios didn’t think direct marketing to fans was worthwhile so didn’t do presentations at conventions.  Once we started doing it, other studios picked up on it and out of that came the studios and networks sending stars out to promote their upcoming projects.

TFTC: You must have had a lot of personal interactions with the Star Wars cast and crew. Did you ever do any autograph collecting yourself?

Craig Miller: No.  I know people love collecting autographs. I get it.  And I understand collecting.  I collect a lot of things.  But I’ve never gotten the bug for autographs.  It might be that I’ve been friends with famous people since I was teenager.  Mostly authors and artists in the science fiction field.  Robert Heinlein.  Ray Bradbury.  Larry Niven.  Kelly Freas.  Bob Eggleton.  And comic book writers and artists like Marv Wolfman, Len Wein, Gil Kane, Russ Manning.  They might not be as famous as movie stars but they were famous.  And when they’re friends, they’re just people.  You don’t ask your next door neighbor for an autograph.  So I’ve just never gotten into it.

TFTC: Skywalker Ranch is now home to a vineyard, Wagyu beef cattle, and a hotel designed to be a high end executive retreat. Can you share some of your experiences and impressions of the ranch back in the late 70’s?

Craig Miller: In the early days when I was there, Skywalker Ranch wasn’t what it is today.  It was mostly undeveloped land.  The buildings that people think of today weren’t constructed yet or were old and in need of remodeling.

Star Wars Celebration Survival Guide

Everything You Need to Get Ready for Celebration

If you’ve been to a comic con before, you may think that you know what to expect for Star Wars Celebration, but Celebration is unlike any other convention experience. While there are many similarities between Celebration and your local comic con, the kinds of preparation, planning, and equipment you need for a successful experience is on a whole different level.

To find out exactly what is needed to have a fun and successful Star Wars Celebration experience, I took over 100 responses from veterans of past Celebrations and distilled them into this essential guide for the con. You’ll learn exactly how to plan out your trip, what you need to bring, and some of the most important lessons learned from those who have been through the experience before. So hold on to your lightsabers as we get you ready to enjoy the ultimate Star Wars fan experience. 

How to Prepare for Star Wars Celebration

Check the Star Wars Celebration page for updates on panels, events, and activities so you can plan out your days. It’s tough to fit in everything you want to, so the more you can plan and prioritize the better. When the schedule of panels/events/activities comes out, make notes of everything you want to do and plan ahead. Rank them in terms of things you must do, want to do, and would be cool to do, that way you prioritize your itinerary. You won’t be able to get everything in, no matter how hard you try so make sure you at least don’t miss out on your highest priorities.

Once you have an idea for what you want to do, you can start to consider how much it will cost. After tickets, lodging, and meals are accounted for, you’re going to need to budget for incidentals. The one word of advice I can offer here is prepare to go over budget! Celebration is many things, but it is not cheap. Prepare to spend more than you planned to when all is said and done. If you see a bit of merch that you must have, it’s probably best to buy it while you can, because things do sell out. However, past conventions have seen a restock of exclusive merch on Saturdays so there may be a chance to get sold out items if you missed them the first time around.

What to Bring to Star Wars Celebration

When I put out a call to past Star Wars Celebration attendees to find out what the must-bring items were, I was surprised. The #1 must-bring item for Star Wars Celebration that was cited time and time again was deodorant. Apparently the convention hall has a tendency to start smelling a little like the swamps of Dagobah towards the end. The fact that deodorant was at the top of so many lists tells you how much of a physical challenge the four day adventure is. There’s high points strewn across all four days of Celebration, between celebrity signings and guest panels, broken up by long waits in lines and a lot of walking back and forth. By the end of each day, everyone is dead tired.

That is why comfort and personal hygiene are of chief concern at Star Wars Celebration, much more so than at a typical convention. The following list of recommended products therefore has a whole section dedicated to must-bring personal hygiene items along with the essentials and items to help pass the time. Of course you’ll want some additional items like your luggage and  extra clothes in your hotel room, but the following are meant to be carried with you on the convention floor at all times!

Essential Items for Celebration 2022

There are some things that you absolutely can not go without at Star Wars Celebration. The cornerstone of your packing list should be your backpack. You want something big enough to hold everything you need for the day. It should also be comfortable enough that you won’t mind wearing it for hours on end. I use the Osprey Atmos AG 65 Men’s Backpacking Backpack. It’s built to be comfortably worn all day and boasts ample storage for everything you’ll be taking to the con.

Once you’ve got a quality backpack sorted, you’re going to need to consider your footwear. Make sure to bring comfortable shoes. They should be already broken in and ready to go. A big part of the Celebration experience is unfortunately going to involve standing in line, so having good shoes is a must. Because a lot of the con is simply a waiting game, chances are that you’ll be looking down at your phone a lot to try and pass the time. Therefore not only is a power bank recommended, but many Celebration-goers recommend that you bring two. The Anker PowerCore 26800 is a good choice for keeping your devices charged. It has a high capacity and the ability to charge multiple devices at once. Another product that you’ll be happy you brought is a collapsible chair. Having somewhere to sit at all times is priceless. Otherwise, you’ll get tired of standing or sitting on the floor real quick.

Wellness / Personal Hygiene Items for Celebration

Taking care of your body while at Star Wars Celebration is essential. Most people don’t realize the amount of endurance it takes to experience all four days. Make sure you have constant access to water by carrying a YETI bottle that will keep your drinks ice cold. Fuel your body by bringing lots of snacks like CLIF energy bars and trail mix. These are dense foods. They pack a lot of energy, but also won’t take up too much space in your backpack. You’ll also thank yourself if you bring Advil or some kind of pain relief product after a long day at Celebration.

Now on to a more sticky subject. I’ll be honest, not only are there incredible sights to see at Celebration, but as previously mentioned, the smells can also be described as, well, let’s just say out of this world. Even if you aren’t a diehard fan who’s willing to sleep in line and forgo a shower in order to get a coveted seat at a panel, after a long day of walking in crowds, you will likely benefit from carrying around a pack of body wipes to keep even just your face fresh. Hand sanitizer and of course that travel sized deodorant will go a long way. 

How to Get Autographs at Celebration

If you plan on purchasing autographs at Celebration you can buy your tickets in advance from Epic Photo Ops. Once you know whose autograph you’re getting, it’s best to come prepared. Start by labeling your items with post-it notes. Annotate to whom you’d like them dedicated and any quote or inscription that you’d like the actor to add. It’s best to bring your own pen if you’d like a specific kind of ink or color. However, make sure you test it out before going to the show, you don’t want to find out the pen is dead after it touches your item. You would also do well to bring a portfolio with photo pages like an Itoya for your autographs because plastic top loaders tend to rub ink off and/or scratch your photos.

If you have larger items that you’d like to get signed like flats, or you think you might pick up some prints while at Celebration, it’s best to bring a poster tube. You can rest assured that whether it’s autographs, prints, or collectables, you’re going to walk away from the convention with a lot of new stuff.

Tips for Success

Remember that COVID-19 vaccinations are required for convention-goers. Have an app like CLEAR that stores your vaccine information. Make sure your other apps are set up and updated like Uber and your hotel’s proprietary app. You may also want to consider mailing your prized purchases home to avoid taking them through TSA or lugging them around for the duration of the convention. There is a FedEx inside the convention center. It may be pricey, but it beats having TSA manhandle your collectibles that you paid a fortune for.

How to Find a Celebrity Phone Number, Call a Celebrity

The idea of calling a celebrity may sound crazy on the face of it, but is it really? You might be surprised at how easy getting in tough with celebrities has become in recent years. Whether it’s through email or more traditional fan mail, there are countless positive stories about fans getting in contact with celebrities. Of course, it’s not easy to just pick up a phone and dial a celebrity directly, but there are ways to reach out if you utilize the services listed below or go through agents.

Call Celebrities Through Agents

A great way to get in touch with celebrities is to go through their agent via the agency that represents the actor. Sometimes this will allow you to get into direct contact with your favorite celebrity. More often than not though, you will more likely be able to get a message to them through the agent. Here are phone numbers and other contact information for talent agencies representing some of the biggest names in Hollywood.

Talent Agency Contact InfoAddressWebsites
369 Universal Artists
Phone: +1 323 461 3833
Email: [email protected]
468 N Camden Dr # 100
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
90210 Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 903 7217
Email: [email protected]
16430 Ventura Blvd # 200
Encino, CA

» Official Website
Abrams Artists Agency
Phone: (310) 859-0625
Email: [email protected]
9200 Sunset Blvd.
11th Floor
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Abstract Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818-876-9647
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
5023 N Parkway
Calabasas, CA

» Official Website
AC Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 878 0800
Email: [email protected]
8447 Wilshire Blvd
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Across The Board (ATB) Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 761 0282
Email: [email protected]
14542 Ventura Blvd # 201
Sherman Oaks, CA

» Official Website
Affinity Artists Agency
Phone: +1 323 525 0577
Email: [email protected]
5455 Wilshire Blvd # 1010
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Agency for the Performing Arts (APA)
Phone: (310) 888-4200
Email: [email protected]
405 S Beverly Dr
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
AKA Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 965 5600
Email: [email protected]
6310 San Vicente Blvd # 200
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
All American Rascals Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 686 6001
Email: [email protected]
10250 Constellation Blvd # 2320
Los Angeles,, CA

» Official Website
Allegory Creative Management
Phone: +1 818 582 8055
Email: [email protected]
13261 Moorpark St # 103
Sherman Oaks, CA

» Official Website
Allensworth Entertainment
Phone: +1 323 333 5493
Email: [email protected]
433 N Camden Dr
4th Fl
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Almond Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 934 5500
Email: [email protected]
8217 Beverly Blvd # 8
West Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
Alvarado Rey Agency
Phone: +1 323 656 2277
Email: [email protected]
7906 Santa Monica Blvd. # 205
Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
American Media Artists (AMA)
Phone: +1 818 986 2946
4741 Laurel Canyon Blvd., # 210
Valley Village, CA
Amsel, Eisenstadt, Frazier & Hinojosa Talent Agency (AEFH)
Phone: +1 323 939 1188
Email: [email protected]
5055 Wilshire Blvd # 865
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
AMT Artists
Phone: +1 818 582 2490
15260 Ventura Blvd # 1200
Sherman Oaks, CA
Angel City Talent
Phone: +1 323 656 5489
Email: [email protected]
8318 Kirkwood Dr
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Aqua Talent Agency
Phone: + 1 310 859 8889
Email: [email protected]
9000 Sunset Blvd # 700
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Arete Talent Agency
Phone: +1 424 278 1601
Email: [email protected]
454 N. Robertson Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
AgencyAddress
Artistic Talent
Phone: +1 323 206 7807
Email: [email protected]
5436 Laurel Canyon # 111
Valley Village, CA

» Official Website
Avalon Artists Group
Phone: +1 323 692 1700
Email: [email protected]
5455 Wilshire Blvd # 900
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Avant Artists
Phone: +1 818 609 1556
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
4869 Topanga Canyon Blvd # 2
Woodland Hills, CA

» Official Website
Baron Entertainment
Phone: +1 323 969 1000
Email: [email protected]
13848 Ventura Blvd # A
Sherman Oaks, CA

» Official Website
BBA Talent,
Beal Talent & Associates
Phone: +1 818 775 0018
Email: [email protected]
8300 Tampa Ave. # K
Northridge, CA

» Official Website
Berman/Sacks Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 337 9033
Email: [email protected]
8335 Sunset Blvd # 225
West Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
Beth Stein and Associates
Phone: +1 310 452 8811
Email: [email protected]
920 Abbot Kinney Blvd
Venice, CA

» Official Website
Beverly Hecht Agency
Phone: +1 818 559 5600
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
12100 Wilshire Boulevard # 800
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Bicoastal Talent & Literary Agency
Phone: +1 818 559 6422
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
2600 W. Olive Ave. # 500
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
Brady, Brannon & Rich Talent (BBR)
Phone: +1 323-938-1989
Email: [email protected]
5670 Wilshire Blvd # 820
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Brant Rose Agency
Phone: +1 323 460 6464
Email: [email protected]
6671 Sunset Blvd # 1584B
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Brianna Blake
Phone: 833.326.6729 opt.1
Email: [email protected]
5760 Legacy Drive
Plano, CA

» Official Website
BRS / Gage Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 857 6666
Email: [email protected]
5757 Wilshire Blvd # 659
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Catalyst Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 820 9195
Email: [email protected]
12424 Wilshire Blvd
9th Fl
Los Angeles, CA
Cavaleri & Associates
Phone: +1 818 955 9300
Email: [email protected]
3500 W. Olive Ave. #
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
Central Artists
Phone: +1 818 557 8284
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
3308 W Burbank Blvd
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
Circle of 10 Talent
Phone: +1 949 701 6215
Email: [email protected]
333 El Camino Real # 200
Tustin, CA

» Official Website
Circle Talent Associates
Phone: +1 310 496 4501
Email: [email protected]
401 Wilshire Blvd # 1200
Santa Monica, CA

» Official Website
Clear Talent Group
Phone: +1 818 509 0121
Email: [email protected]
10950 Ventura Blvd
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
Coast to Coast Talent Group
Phone: +1 323 845 9200
Email: [email protected]
3350 Barham Blvd
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Creative Artists Agency
Phone: (424) 288-2000
Email: [email protected]
2000 Avenue of the Stars
# 100
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Cunningham Escott Slevin & Doherty (CESD)
Phone: +1 310 475 2111
Email: [email protected]
10635 Santa Monica Blvd # 130
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Daniel Hoff Agency
Phone: +1 323 932 2500
Email: [email protected]
5455 Wilshire Blvd # 1100
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
David Shapira & Associates
Phone: +1 310 967 0480
Email: [email protected]
193 N Robertson Blvd
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Defining Artists Agency
Phone: +1 424-302-0073
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
193 N Robertson Blvd
Second Floor
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Domain Talent
Phone: +1 310 888 8500
9229 Sunset Blvd # 710
Los Angeles, CA
Don Buchwald & Associates
Phone: (323) 655-7400
Email: [email protected]
6500 Wilshire Blvd # 2200
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Eddiemer
Phone: 84342854642
Email: [email protected]
Jbeil
Jbeil
Jbeil, CA

» Official Website
Element Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 893 1894
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
11425 Moorpark St North
Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
elev8
Phone: +1 310 734 8688
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
489 S. Robertson Blvd. # 206
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Ellis Talent Group,
Envy Model and Talent
Phone: +1 310 694 8567
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
489 S. Robertson Blvd. # 104A
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Equitable Stewardship For Artists (ESA)
Phone: +1 310 853 4200
Email: [email protected]
6363 Wilshire Blvd. # 650
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
FireStarter Entertainment
Phone: +1 213 531 0547
Email: [email protected]
4304 Wildwest Circle
Moorpark, CA

» Official Website
First Artists Management
Phone: +1 818 377 7750
Email: [email protected]
4764 Park Granada # 110
Calabasas, CA

» Official Website
First Class Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818-424-3280
Email: [email protected]
13440 Ventura Blvd.
2nd Fl.
Sherman Oaks, CA

» Official Website
Gar Lester Agency (GLA)
Phone: +1 818 769 1400
Email: [email protected]
11026 Ventura Blvd # 10
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
Glick Agency,
Global Artists Agency
Phone: +1 323 836 0320
Email: [email protected]
6253 Hollywood Blvd # 508
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Grace Talent Organization
Phone: +1 323 424 4494
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
8370 Wilshire Blvd # 340
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Grant, Savic, Kopaloff & Associates
Phone: +1 323 782 1854
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
6399 Wilshire Blvd # 415
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Green and Green Talent Group
Phone: +1 310 720 9169
Email: [email protected]
6363 Wilshire Blvd # 420
Los Angeles, CA
Greene & Associates Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 550 9333
Email: [email protected]
1901 Avenue of the Stars # 130
Los Angeles, CA
GVA Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 278 1310
Email: [email protected]
8981 Sunset Blvd # 204
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Happen Agency
Phone: +1 818 588 6437
Email: [email protected]
9795 Cabrini Dr # 206
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
Henderson Represents
Phone: +1 818 733 2424
Email: [email protected]
100 Universal City Plaza # 7152
Universal City, CA

» Official Website
Hollywood Original Talent
Phone: +1 323 460 2951
Email: [email protected]
6115 Selma Ave. # 207
Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
House of Representatives
Phone: +1 310 451 2345
Email: [email protected]seofreps.com
1434 6th St #1
Santa Monica, CA
Howard Talent West
Phone: +1 818-766-5300
Email: [email protected]
17000 Ventura Blvd # 210
Encino, CA

» Official Website
HTG Artists
Phone: +1 818-387-8812
Email: [email protected]
4150 W Riverside Dr
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
ICM Partners
Phone: +1 310 550 4000
Email: [email protected]
10250 Constellation Blvd
9th Floor
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Ideal Talent Agency (I.T.A.)
Phone: +1 818 306 9223
Email: [email protected]
10806 Ventura Blvd # 2
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
Innovative Artists
Phone: (310) 656-0400
Email: [email protected]
1505 10th St
Santa Monica, CA

» Official Website
Integrity Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818-386-8592
Email: [email protected]
2600 W. Olive Ave.
5th Floor
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
Jaime Ferrar Agency
Phone: +1 818 506 8311
Email: [email protected]
4741 Laurel Canyon Blvd # 110
Valley Village, CA

» Official Website
Jana Luker Agency
Phone: +1 310 441 2822
20501 Ventura Blvd #115
Woodland Hills, CA
Jenny Stricklin Talent Agency
Phone: +1 747 477 1400
Email: [email protected]
178 S Victory Blvd
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
JKA Talent
Phone: +1 818 980 2093
Email: [email protected]
412725 Ventura Boulevard # H
Studio City, CA
JLA Talent
Phone: +1 310-276-5677
Email: [email protected]
9151 Sunset Blvd
West Hollywood,, CA

» Official Website
Joseph Le Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818 973 2705
Email: [email protected]
3500 West Olive Avenue, # 300
Burbank, CA
JVC Talent Agency
Phone: +1 323 420 3800
Email: [email protected]
11030 Ventura Blvd # 2
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
Kathleen Schultz Associates Talent Agency (KSA)
Phone: +1 818 760 3100
Email: [email protected]
6442 Coldwater Canyon # 206
Valley Glen, CA

» Official Website
Kazarian/Measures/Ruskin & Associates (KMR)
Phone: +1 818-769-9111
Email: [email protected]
11969 Ventura Blvd # 300
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
LB Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818 380-3099
15303 Ventura Blvd, # 900
Sherman Oaks, CA
Linda McAlister Talent
Phone: +1 626 529 5739
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
30 N Raymond # 213
Pasadena, CA

» Official Website
Littman Talent Group
Phone: +1 818 853 9400
Email: [email protected]
15720 Ventura Blvd Suite # 611
Encino, CA

» Official Website
M.O. Artist Agency
Phone: +1 818 227 5158
Email: [email protected]
6320 Canoga Ave
15th Floor
Woodland Hills, CA

» Official Website
Malaky International
Phone: +1 310 777 7560
Email: [email protected]
205 S. Beverly Dr. # 211
Beverly Hills, CA
Marlene Agency
Phone: +1 310 578 5099
Email: [email protected]
4150 Via Dolce
Marina Del Rey, CA

» Official Website
Mavrick Artists Agency
Phone: +1 323 931 5555
Email: [email protected]
8383 Wilshire Blvd # 330
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
McDonald Selznick Associates (MSA)
Phone: +1 323 957 6680
Email: [email protected]
953 Cole Ave
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Media Artists Group
Phone: +1 323 658 5050
Email: [email protected]
8222 Melrose Ave
2nd Floor
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Metropolitan (MTA)
Phone: +1 323 857 4500
5405 Wilshire Blvd # 218
Los Angeles, CA
Michael Zanuck Agency (MZA)
Phone: +1 818 707 9747
Email: [email protected]
28035 Dorothy Dr. Suite 120
Agoura Hills, CA

» Official Website
MMV
Phone: +1 323-206-5050
Email: [email protected]
4221 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 2903
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Mogan Entertainment
Phone: +1 424 343 0445
Email: [email protected]
1011 Palm Ave #302
West Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
Momentum Talent and Literary Agency
Phone: +1 310 858 6655
Email: [email protected]
9401 Wilshire Blvd # 501
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Nancy Chaidez & Associates
Phone: +1 323 467 8954
Email: [email protected]
6340 Coldwater Canyon #214
North Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
Origin Talent
Phone: +1 818 487 1800
Email: [email protected]
4705 Laurel Canyon Blvd # 303
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
Osbrink Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818 760 2488
Email: [email protected]
4343 Lankershim Blvd # 100
Universal City, CA

» Official Website
Pacific Talent & Models
Phone: +1 310 321 7670
Email: [email protected]
1600 Rosecrans Ave Media Center,
4th Fl
Manhattan Beach, CA

» Official Website
Pakula/King and Associates
Phone: +1 310 281 4868
9229 Sunset Blvd # 400
Los Angeles, CA
Pantheon Talent
Phone: +1 310 201 0120
Email: [email protected]
1801 Century Park East # 1910
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Paradigm Talent Agency
Phone: (310) 273-6700
Email: [email protected]
9336 Civic Center Drive
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Prestige Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 777 7707
Email: [email protected]
9100 Wilshire Blvd # 725E
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Privilege Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818 386 2377
17514 Ventura Blvd # 105
Encino, CA
Prodigy Talent
Phone: +1 310 462-2310
Email: [email protected]
7080 Hollywood Blvd # 1100
Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
Productions Plus
Phone: +1 310 324 5544
Email: [email protected]
879 W 190th Street # 1150
Gardena, CA

» Official Website
Progressive Artists Agency
Phone: +1 310 559 9700
9696 Culver Blvd # 110
Culver City, CA
Rebel Entertainment Partners
Phone: +1 323 935 1700
Email: [email protected]
5700 Wilshire Blvd # 456
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Resolution Talent & Literary Agency
Phone: +1 424 274 4200
Email: [email protected]
1801 Century Park East
23rd Floor
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Rogers Orion Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818 789 7064
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
13731 Ventura Blvd # D
Sherman Oaks, CA

» Official Website
RPM Talent Agency
Phone: +1 818 333 5150
Email: [email protected]
2600 W Olive Ave
5th Fl
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
Sandra Marsh & Associates
Phone: +1 310 285 0303
Email: [email protected]
6420 Wilshire Blvd # 880
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Savage Agency
Phone: +1 323 461 8316
Email: [email protected]
6212 Banner Ave
Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
SDB Partners
Phone: +1 310 785 0060
315 S Beverly Dr # 411
Beverly Hills, CA
Smith & Hervey/Grimes Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 475 2010
Email: [email protected]
3002 Midvale Ave # 206
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
SMS Talent
Phone: +1 310 289 0909
8383 Wilshire Blvd # 230
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Sovereign Talent Group
Phone: +1 310 474 4000
Email: [email protected]
1642 Westwood Blvd # 202
Westwood, CA

» Official Website
AgencyAddress
Spectrum Talent
Phone: +1 310 862 4922
Email: [email protected]
9107 Wilshire Blvd # 450
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Stewart Talent
Phone: +1 213-943-2970
Email: [email protected]
7250 Melrose Avenue # 4
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Stone Manners Salners Agency (SMS)
Phone: +1 323 655 1313
Email: [email protected]
6100 Wilshire Blvd # 1500
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Susan Nathe & Associates
Phone: +1 323 653 7573
8281 Melrose Ave # 200
Los Angeles, CA
Synergy Talent
Phone: +1 818 995 6500
Email: [email protected]
13251 Ventura Blvd
Studio City, CA

» Official Website
Talent House LA
Phone: +1 310 315 4797
Email: [email protected]
3000 Olympic Blvd # 2226
Santa Monica, CA

» Official Website
TalentWorks
Phone: +1 818 972 4300
Email: [email protected]
3500 W Olive Ave # 1400
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
TCA/Jed Root
Phone: +1 310 432 2929
Email: [email protected]
9220 Sunset Blvd # 315
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
The Carry Company
Phone: +1 213 388 0770
Email: [email protected]
3875 Wilshire Blvd # 402
4th Fl.
Los Angeles,

» Official Website
The Chasin Agency
Phone: +1 310 278 7505
Email: [email protected]
8899 Beverly Blvd. # 716
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
The Corsa Agency
Phone: +1 310 231 7010
11704 Wilshire Blvd # 204
Los Angeles, CA
The Culbertson Group
Phone: +1 323 650 9454
Email: [email protected]
9107 Wilshire Blvd # 450
Beverly Hills, CA
The Gersh Agency
Phone: (310) 274-6611
Email: [email protected]
9465 Wilshire Blvd
# 600 6th Fl
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
The Jerry Pace Agency
Phone: +1 818 501 8919
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]paceagency.com
120 South Victory Blvd. # 205
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
The Kohner Agency
Phone: +1 310 550 1060
Email: [email protected]
9300 Wilshire Blvd # 555
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
The Levin Agency
Phone: +1 323 653 7073
Email: [email protected]
8484 Wilshire Blvd. # 750
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
The Polygon Group
Phone: +1 747 248 7012
Email: [email protected]
303 N. Glenoaks Blvd # 200
Burbank, CA

» Official Website
The Skouras Agency
Phone: +1 310 395 9550
Email: [email protected]
1149 Third St
3rd Fl
Santa Monica, CA

» Official Website
The Stander Group
Phone: +1 818 905 7000
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
4533 Van Nuys Blvd # 401
Sherman Oaks, CA

» Official Website
The Stevens Group
Phone: +1 818 528 3674
14011 Ventura Blvd # 201
Sherman Oaks, CA
The Strain Group
Phone: +1 323 525 3391
5455 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA
The Wayne Agency
Phone: +1 310 492 5994
Email: [email protected]
3255 Wilshire Blvd., 15th Floor # 1534
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Tilmar Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 623 9231
Email: [email protected]
6404 Wilshire Blvd # 735
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
United Talent Agency
Phone: (310) 273-6700
Email: [email protected]
9336 Civic Center Drive
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website
Universal Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 226 6105
Email: [email protected]
4221 Wilshire Blvd # 290-17
Los Angeles, CA

» Official Website
Vesta Talent Agency
Phone: +1 310 538 8298
Email: [email protected]
1600 Rosecrans Ave. Media Center
4th Floor
Manhattan Beach, CA

» Official Website
William Kerwin Agency
Phone: +1 323 469 5155
Email: [email protected]
1605 N Cahuenga Blvd # 202
Hollywood, CA

» Official Website
William Morris Endeavor
Phone: (310) 285-9000
9601 Wilshire Blvd
3rd Fl
Beverly Hills, CA

» Official Website